Upcoming flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft into space, proof that Moon landing never happened?

As far as I know, the Van Allen belt filters out harmful radiation from the sun. In the world of UFOs, it is absent over the north and south poles. During the space race, there were fears that missions to the moon punctured the Van Allen belt, thereby exposing us to harmful radiation. Why the sudden concern about the Van Allen belt? -LW


NASA’s newest spacecraft, Orion, will be launching into space for the first time in December 2014, on a flight that will take it farther than any spacecraft built to carry humans has gone in more than 40 years and through temperatures twice as hot as molten lava to put its critical systems to the test.

According to the video below, spacecraft Orion will test the Van Allen radiation belt first before they can send people through this region of space.

Listen carefully at around 3:36 what the man says: “We must solve this problem before we send people through this region of space” (the Van Allen radiation belt).

Didn’t they already send 6 manned crews through this region on the way to the moon in the Apollo missions?

If NASA is still working on testing the Van Allen radiation belt in order to solve that problem before they can send the astronauts through this region of space, than it is really amazing what the engineers of NASA in the 60’s and with the technology of the 60’s have done to solve that problem, leading to the first moon landing in ’69.

If the moon missions were real, then it seems the whole “the Van Allen radiation belt” problem should have been solved over 40 years ago and at least have landed on Mars by now and flown manned flights to one of Mars’ moons or even a flyby of Saturn or Jupiter.

After watching this video I have to seriously doubt that there were ever any “NASA” manned space flights to the moon.

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Mars Base Destroyed: Fact Or Fiction? Benjamin Fulford Video Update

What if the explosion we saw on Mars around the time of Comet Siding Spring really was a Mars base being destroyed? -LW


In the latest video update from the website of Benjamin Fulford we’re told that the ‘battle for planet Earth’ is reaching a final climax while a secretive US base on Mars was recently destroyed. Fulford claims that the 2nd video below captures the Mars explosion and we admit, we have to wonder, we thought this explosion was somehow caused by a passing comet, but clearly there are those who now say otherwise.

We can confirm through MI5 British Intelligence that last week NASA abruptly terminated live coverage of a comet approaching Mars after a planet sized explosion suddenly appeared there.

A US based source who correctly predicted the trouble in the Ukraine and the disappearance of the Malaysian airliner, says the “the US Mars base was destroyed.” British intelligence confirmed that contrary to what the world public has been told, the US did in indeed have people on Mars.

A spokesperson for Japan’s national observatory said “if NASA is not going to comment on that, then certainly we won’t either.”

This writer was also contacted over the phone recently by people claiming to be part of the group that seized the US underground bases. They say they found people in cages and signs of gruesome genetic experiments. The bases remain closed to prevent the Western Cabal elite from fleeing to them, the sources say.

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

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U.S. rocket explosion probed; space station resupplied

Based on what you’ve read about friendly ETs interfering with nuclear weapons and the desperation of the Bush-Clinton crime family (cabal), what do you think is the real story? Was this a a failed attempt at arming the International Space Station? Is this evidence that off-worlders are acting on our behalf? -LW


Reuters By Ian Simpson and Irene Klotz
 35 minutes ago

WALLOPS Va. (Reuters) – Authorities on Wednesday started investigating what made an unmanned U.S. supply rocket explode in a fireball moments after lifting off from a launch pad in Virginia, destroying supplies and equipment bound for the International Space Station.

The 14-story Antares rocket, built and launched by Orbital Sciences Corp, blasted off from the Wallops Flight Facility at 6:22 p.m. EDT on Tuesday but burst into flames moments later, the first disaster since NASA turned to private operators to run cargo to the space station.

Orbital Sciences stock fell 15.9 percent to $25.54 on Wednesday.

The rocket was carrying a Cygnus cargo ship with a 5,000 pound (2,273 kg) payload for the station, a $100 billion research laboratory owned and operated by 15 nations that orbits about 260 miles (418 km) above Earth.

The loss of the supply vessel posed no immediate problem for the orbiting station’s six crew: two from NASA, one from the European Space Agency and three Russians, officials said.

“There was no cargo that was absolutely critical to us that was lost on that flight. The crew is in no danger,” National Aeronautics and Space Administration Associate Administrator William Gerstenmaier said.

Russia’s Roskosmos space agency said it was ready to help ferry extra U.S. cargo to the space station if NASA requested. The station is overseen by Russia and the United States, whose relations are at a low ebb over the Ukraine crisis.

The unmanned Russian Progress supply vehicle launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan hours after the explosion and the capsule, carrying more than 5,000 pounds of food, fuel and supplies, reached the station at 9:08 a.m. EDT.

No one was hurt in the U.S. accident but witnesses said the explosion shook buildings for miles around and described a massive ball of fire lighting up the evening sky.

In the control room, reaction was a mix of “shock and professionalism,” said Frank Culbertson, Orbital Executive Vice President and mission director.

“Everyone did their job and secured the data and assessed what we had going and made sure that everything was safe and secure and then we went through our contingency plan.”

Within a few days, he said, investigators would have a “pretty good idea” of where the failure began. “What exactly caused it may take a little bit longer and corrective action probably will take some time, from weeks to months,” he added.

The area around the Wallops Flight Facility was cordoned off on Wednesday and a helicopter circled overhead, surveying.

Ronda Miller, manager of the Ocean Deli in Wallops Island, Virginia, told Reuters she felt the force of the blast, about 5 miles (8 km) from the launch pad.

“We were standing outside waiting for it to launch and we saw bright red, and then we saw a big black cloud, and it shook the whole building where we work,” Miller said.

The Cygnus mission was non-military but the company’s Antares program manager, Mike Pinkston, said the craft included “some classified cryptographic equipment, so we do need to maintain the area around the debris in a secure manner”.

RUSSIAN ROCKET ENGINES

The Antares is powered by the AJ-26 engine built by GenCorp Inc division Aerojet Rocketdyne. In May, an AJ-26 exploded during a ground test at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. GenCorp shares lost 6.9 percent to $15.99.

The accident also renewed questions about the use of Russian engines in U.S. rockets. Congress has been concerned about Russian-made RD-180 engines that power United Launch Alliance’s Atlas 5 rockets, used primarily to fly U.S. military satellites.

The RD-180 has had no technical problems but Russia has threatened to suspend exports in response to U.S. trade sanctions prompted by Moscow’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region. United Launch Alliance is a partnership of Lockheed Martin and Boeing.

It was unclear how much Tuesday’s explosion would cost Orbital Sciences, whose flight was partly insured. The rocket and the cargo ship it carried were valued at $200 million, Culbertson said.

Virginia-based Orbital Sciences is one of two companies NASA has hired to fly cargo to the station after NASA’s space shuttles were retired. Tuesday’s flight was to be the third of eight under the company’s $1.9 billion contract with NASA.

The second U.S. supply line to the station is run by privately owned Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, which is preparing its fourth flight under a separate $1.6 billion NASA contract, slated for Dec. 9.

The Cygnus carried a prototype satellite owned by Redmond, Washington-based startup Planetary Resources Inc., which is developing technology to mine asteroids.

Orbital Sciences is merging with Alliant Techsystems Inc’s Aerospace and Defense division, a deal analysts expect to close sometime early next year.

(Editing by James Dalgleish)

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Mars Probes Give Scientists Box Seats For Rare Comet Flyby

This flyby is being streamed at this URL, starting on October 29th at 2:15 PM EDT (GMT -0400).

An artist's rendering of the flyby with Mars orbiters taking cover. Note that the image says "spacecraft not to scale."  NASA/JPL-Caltech

An artist’s rendering of the flyby with Mars orbiters taking cover. Note that the image says “spacecraft not to scale.”

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mars is about to get a visitor that comes around only once in a million years or so.

The arrival of a “mountain-sized” comet, Siding Spring (C/2013 A1), is made all the more extraordinary by the fact that humans — who were busy refining their stone-tool-making skills the last time such an event might have occurred — now have spacecraft from multiple countries at the Red Planet to see it happen.

“Think about a comet that started its travel probably at the dawn of man and it’s just coming in close now,” Carey Lisse, a senior astrophysicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, said at a news briefing about Comet Siding Spring last week. “And the reason we can actually observe it is because we have built satellites and rovers. We’ve now got outposts around Mars.”

As the nucleus of the comet passes about 80,000 miles from the Martian surface The nucleus of the comet will make its closest approach to Mars at 1:32 p.m. ET on Sunday, orbiters from NASAEurope and India are all being repurposed to quickly observe the comet flyby and then beat a retreat before the comet’s tail swings by.

As The Associated Press writes: “The orbiting craft will observe the incoming iceball, then hide behind Mars for protection from potentially dangerous debris in the comet tail. NASA’s Opportunity and Curiosity rovers will be shielded by the Martian atmosphere. They should have the best seats in the house.”

Emily Lakdawalla, a senior editor for The Planetary Society, says: “There are tons and tons of scientific observations planned by Mars orbiters, Mars rovers, and Earth-based observatories. In fact, most of the facilities that are planning to observe Siding Spring have already begun their work, and will continue observation for days after the encounter.”

Lakdawalla adds: “It’s not like a Mars landing; there won’t be a single moment when a bunch of serious-looking engineers suddenly erupt into cheers. Instead, there’ll be many smaller, non-televised moments as instrument teams receive their data from far-flung spacecraft and telescopes, spread out over the next several days. For the most part, the images of the comet won’t be instant classics; many will show only a single pixel, or a faint smudge. Some of the data won’t even arrive on Earth until the middle of next week.”

As astronomer Phil Plait, who writes the Bad Astronomy blog for Slate, notes:

The NASA comet page says the coma (the big fuzzy cloud of gas surrounding the solid nucleus of the comet) is about 20,000 km across. At closest approach, that means that if you were standing on Mars, the comet would appear to be over 8° across! That means that if you have a big hand, you could just barely block it with your upraised fist.

“That’s astonishing. What a view that would be! And while the astronomer part of my brain is envious and wishes we could see something like that from Earth, the human part of my brain is screaming obscenities at the astronomer part of my brain. In real life, it’s probably best comets keep their distance from us.”

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Historic Flyby: Comet to Zoom Past Mars This Weekend

A comet will buzz Mars this Sunday (Oct. 19) in an epic encounter that has astronomers around the world tingling with excitement.

Comet Siding Spring, also known as C/2013 A1, will miss the Red Planet by just 87,000 miles (140,000 kilometers) at 2:27 p.m. EDT (1827 GMT) on Sunday. For comparison, the moon orbits Earth at an average distance of 239,000 miles (384,600 km).

While the comet won’t put on a show for skywatchers here on Earth, the fleet of robotic explorers at Mars will get an eyeful. They will study the comet, as well as any observable interactions between its shed particles and the thin Martian atmosphere. [See photos of Comet Siding Spring]

Comets are icy leftovers from the solar system’s birth, and Siding Spring is a pristine object that has never been “heat-treated” by the sun before. So any insights about the comet’s composition and behavior could help researchers better understand how our cosmic neighborhood began taking shape 4.6 billion years ago.

“This is a cosmic science gift that could potentially keep on giving, and the agency’s diverse science missions will be in full receive mode,” former astronaut John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, said in a statement. “This particular comet has never before entered the inner solar system, so it will provide a fresh source of clues to our solar system’s earliest days.”

All five operational spacecraft orbiting the Red Planet — NASA’s Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and MAVEN probes, India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft and Europe’s Mars Express — will observe the flyby. And NASA’s Opportunity and Curiosity rovers will crane their necks up to watch from the Martian surface as well.

The Siding Spring observation campaign is not restricted to the closeMars approach on Sunday. A number of different instruments on the ground and in space have already been observing Siding Spring, and they’ll continue to do so after the comet leaves the Red Planet in its rear-view mirror. A primary goal is to see how a pristine comet changes as it gets closer and closer to the sun.

There is no chance that Siding Spring will hit Mars during the flyby, and analyses suggest that material shed by the comet poses little danger to orbiting spacecraft. (Opportunity and Curiosity will definitely be fine, protected as they are by Mars’ air.) But NASA is taking precautions anyway; the space agency has maneuvered its orbiters to make sure they’ll be on the safe side of the planet when Mars gets closest to Siding Spring’s dust tail, officials have said.

The mountain-size Siding Spring spends most of its time in the Oort Cloud, a frigid comet repository that lies perhaps 50,000 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. (One AU is the distance from Earth to the sun — about 93 million miles, or 150 million km).

Scientists think Siding Spring’s multimillion-year orbit has never taken it closer to the sun than the realm of the giant planets (Saturn, Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune). So the comet’s current journey is something special — something to marvel at for several different reasons, researchers said.

“This comet got knocked into the inner [solar] system by the passage of a star near the Oort Cloud. So, think about a comet that started its travel probably at the dawn of man, and it’s just coming in close now,” ‪Carey Lisse, a senior astrophysicist at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, said during a news conference on Thursday (Oct. 9).

“The reason we can actually observe it is because we have built satellites and rovers, and we’ve now got outposts around Mars,” Lisse added. “That’s pretty exciting.”

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us@Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.

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Super Typhoon VongFong: The Most Powerful Storm on Earth This Year Is Heading for Japan

I wonder what Ben Fulford will have to say about this, next week… -LW

Infrared satellite image of Super Typhoon Vongfong as of Oct. 7, 2014.

UPDATE, Oct. 7, 10:45 p.m. ET: Super Typhoon Vongfong is maintaining its extraordinary intensity, with 180 mile per hour estimated sustained winds and higher gusts. It is giving rise to waves of at least 50 feet in height, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC).

Forecasters say Vongfong is likely to remain a Category 5 storm through much of the day on Wednesday, perhaps even intensifying further, unless internal processes weaken it unexpectedly. As it has for the past two days, the storm track forecast remains focused on an eventual landfall in Japan early next week, but the JTWC says it has “low confidence” in the exact track this far in advance.

Image of Super Typhoon Vongfong using NASA’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which shows the storm illuminated by moonlight.

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